Christrospection

Time’s refreshing there’s a threshing hand are pulling off
I’m uncertain as I set it there’s a shaky thought
First the focus was the process and out of the box
Then we grooved into the tracks that they warned us about
Who hasn’t had to fake forgiveness cause Love is the boss

Weld my hands to them ploughs and comot the noise
Yah my Jireh and the dark is in both of the testaments
Both of the testaments
And my brethren are runners from different walks
Sparking through the throng, Jesus with the miracles
Jesus with the miracles

Zero till he did it
None till he gimme
Sometimes it hurts, but chasing is fun
Faith say he will finish
Blind to the seeming
Sound the horns, let the Word Ones wake

Time to wake the message in the hearts of many men
What was hard before can eat the ease of acumen
Born to start infernos, tongues of fire on their heads
I said Take the full armor, they said Take your meds

Weld my hands to them ploughs and comot the noise
Yah my Jireh and the dark is in both of the testaments
Both of the testaments
And my brethren are runners from different walks
Sparking through the throng, Jesus with the miracles
Jesus with the miracles

Niel Quchi
© 2023

THE CHOSEN REVIEW: INDESCRIBABLE COMPASSION

The sixth episode of The Chosen comes fully packed.


The miracles, the dialogue, the acting, everything blends together in this episode to make the character development and subplot unravel perfectly.


The two miracles we witness happen in controversial situations. Jesus could have easily walked away from healing them but defied the odds and showed them compassion.

This reiterates the fact that the love and mercy Christ has for humanity is indescribable.


One major scene in this episode is shot in Zebedee’s house and it features the healing of the paralytic.

It would seem like an ordinary scene with different components and conflicts going on but surprisingly, the chaos blossomed into a bursting delight.


We see through the eyes of Matthew and Nicodemus how the miracle they witnessed created a quest, a yearning for truth, much of which will be depicted in the coming episodes.


Indescribable Compassion portrays Jesus as a friend, teacher, the saviour and most importantly, the son of God.


PS: To watch this episode, download The Chosen app here.


Please read our review of The Chosen’s Ep 3, The Wedding Gift.

Things Unseen!

I don’t know much about faith,
But if mine could be measured,
I am sure a mustard seed would feel bigger,
And a feather would hold more weight,
And tip the scale more than my faith,
On any given SI Unit

I don’t know much about Agric science;
How one plants a seed in an unknown soil,
In the night, full of uncertainties,
Hoping it germinates into a plant,
Bearing fruits of things one wished for,

I don’t know much about moving Mountains,
But I know of the Faith,
That made a woman wrestle her way through a crowd,
So that her rain forest of blood could be a desert,
That multiplied five loaves and two fishes into thousands and five baskets,
That defied the law of physics,
So, Peter could walk on water,

I don’t know much about Miracles,
But I know the One,
That turned water to wine,
That called the dead out of his tomb,
And called the bluff of a storm,
He is the one I present this little seed to,
Hoping that the things unseen in my life,
Manifests into sights best known to man.

Olaoye Adeleye
(C) 2019

Book Review: MIRACLES By C.S. Lewis

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Author: Clive Staples Lewis
Publisher: Harper Collins
Reviewer: Ikenna Nwachukwu

Seas parting to let humans pass through. Fire falling from the sky. A dead man coming back to life. Miracles.

The Bible tells about such happenings, and we see them as interventions from God, demonstrations of His power over all of creation, and proof of His sovereignty. We are awed by them. But the skeptic will see things differently. He will scoff and laugh it all off as myth, as something belonging with the league of fairytales.

In his book Miracles, C.S. Lewis challenges the disbelieving attitude to miracles put up by many of the intellectual type and much of the modern world. He tackles the widely held notion that supernatural occurrences are impossible, and establishes that the basis for such skepticism is not a deep knowledge of science and the laws of nature, but on a misconception of the basic ideas that underpin our understanding of nature and its workings.

Rather than dive straight into proposing reasons for believing in miracles, Lewis starts off by addressing the worldview held by the unbeliever. This worldview, he says, is what gives rise to the idea in the mind of the skeptic that miracles don’t happen. He identifies this as naturalism, a basic belief that the physical world is all that there is- as opposed to supernaturalism, which argues for the role of causes other than factors in the natural world (such as a God). But then he points out that naturalism, which doesn’t allow for a God to have His say in the natural world’s workings, is a faulty way of looking at existence. Naturalism tell us that physical causes lead to physical effects, but it doesn’t help us capture those events in communicable ways, or explain why we can even think about such processes rationally. In short, he says, naturalism cannot tell us why rational thought is possible, since it only proposes material things as causes- and the mind, which thinks, is not physical. Consciousness, Lewis asserts, must have an origin that is ‘out of this world’.

Lewis’ argument from reason helps prepare the ground for a detailed examination of the objections to miracles often cited by those who do not believe. He makes the interesting point that miracles aren’t necessarily “violations” of the laws of nature; they are uncommon events which are traceable to a divine agent, but are also explainable as occurrences that happen through natural processes. He says that miracles give the impression that the natural world can, and occasionally is, “tampered with” (by a divine will), so that outcomes in those instances seem to be glaringly unlike what we would expect from nature operating as usual.

Miracles has a lot in it for anyone who is searching for arguments in favour of believing in the supernatural. It can also serve as a great gift to a skeptic friend; it could set them on the path to thinking differently not just about miracles, but about their worldview, and the possibility that they could be better off having faith in God and in His goodness.